Valentine’s Day flowers

Published : February 15, 2018

The language of love

Valentine's Day is just around the corner and a bouquet of beautiful blooms is the perfect gift for your beloved.

But different flowers - and even different colours - have different meanings, from perfect love to fiery passion to innocence and humility.

So pick your flower carefully to convey the perfect meaning to your Valentine.



Roses are one of the traditional flowers to gift to you Valentine: but different colours have different meanings so choose your rose carefully! The red rose is symobolic of romantic love and connotes love, longing or desire. A single red rose simply means "I love you".

If your Valentine gets you a little hot under the collar, consider gifting them an orange rose as it symbolises intense desire and passion. Whereas the white roses is the opposite: a symbol of purity, innocence and humility. White roses are often associated with wedding bouquets.

The pink rose  conveys a gentle, tender love and symbolises joy, admiration, elegance and grace. If your love is just beginning, consider giving your Valentine a lavender-coloured rose which connotes love at first sight or enchantment.

If you plan to anonymously send your Valentine roses, consider sending a bouquet of blue roses. As the blue rose cannot be naturally grown, they represent mystery.

The yellow rose is a great Galentine's Day gift to give to your BFF as it symbolises friendship and caring (although beware as in some cultures, a yellow rose stands for jealousy and infidelity!). Or perhaps a peach rose as they symbolise appreciation, sincerity and gratitude.



Tulips symbolise perfect love and, as with roses, different colours carry their own significance. Purple tulips symbolise royalty, white tulips send a message of forgiveness, orange tulips denote happiness and fascination and yellow tulips mean cheerful thought.



The Sunflower is the third wedding anniversary flower and is symbloc of the sun, conveying warmth and adoration, loyalty and longevity.



This delicate and elegant bloom symbolises love, luxury and beauty. This is a perfect gift for lovers, as orchards represent erotic or passionate love. In fact, the name orchid is in fact derived from the Greek word “orkhis” as it was thought the tubers resembled the male anatomy.



Symbolising love and good luck, carnations come in a wide range of colours and shapes all with different meanings: dark red symbolising deep love and affection, purple meaning capriciousness, and pink carnations symbolising a mother's undying love.



The alstroemeria, also known as the Peruvian Lily, means devotion and mutual support, and is the perfect gift for family members or friends.

A bouquet of alstroemerias conveys your intention to always be there for them.



The symbolism of the gebera daisy is the simple beauty of a happy life. As a gift they indicate innocence, purity, cheerfulness and joy. Gerberas are also the birth flower of April and are the fifth most popular flower in the world.



The daffodil’s primary symbolism is that of rebirth, renewal and new beginnings. They can also mean creativity and inspiration so would be a perfect gift for a partner who is your muse. The March birth flower and the 10th wedding anniversary flower, a gift of daffodils is said to ensure happiness.


Where to buy Valentine's Day Flowers

1: Indris Zekirija Flowers

2: J&E Flowers

3: Jenny's Flowers

4: Mr Fresh

5: Petra Flowers